{"_id":"5835ffd0f50e460f009179b7","sync_unique":"","version":"56be3388be55991700c3ca10","__v":0,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"category":"57646d30c176520e00ea8fe5","isReference":false,"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"body":"Websolr is a SaaS provider that allows users to create and manage Apache Solr indices through an easy to use dashboard interface. This introductory page will take you through the basics of Websolr and what we offer. You can read more specifics by navigating to the pages linked on the left.\n\n## What is Solr?\n\nSolr is a high performance server based on the [Apache Lucene](http://lucene.apache.org/) information retrieval library. It can be used for searching millions of pages of data in a few milliseconds, and returning highly relevant results. It is trusted by Fortune 500 companies, startups, and high traffic brands to deliver fast, accurate results.\n\n## Up and running in 3 easy steps!\n\nBefore you can use Solr with your application, you'll need to set up and configure an index. The process is very simple and straightforward:\n\n1. When you first log in to Websolr, you will have the opportunity to create a new Solr index.\n\n2. Creating an index requires 3 things: a name, a region and a schema.\n\n* The name of your index can be anything you want, it will simply allow you differentiate it from others you may create. Note: you can not have two indices with the same name.\n\n* The region will allow you to create the index on a server group in one of the regions we support. Currently, those are US-West (N. California), US-East (Virginia), and EU-West (Ireland). You should select a region that is nearby to wherever your application is hosted to get the lowest possible latency.\n\n* The schema will tell Solr how to set up your index. This generally varies by application. While users are able to submit their own custom schema, we also have a list of the most common Solr clients (what applications use to \"talk\" with Solr) available as a drop down. For example, if your application is based on Ruby on Rails and you're using the Sunspot gem, you can simply select one of the configurations marked 'Sunspot', and we'll handle the rest.\n\n3. Once this information has been submitted, we'll go about the task of provisioning your index. We will provide you with a special URL that is unique to your index, and can be used to connect your application to Solr.\n\nThat's it! With Websolr, you can be up and running with your very own Solr searches in no time.\n\n[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"info\",\n  \"body\": \"Heroku users setting up Websolr as an addon will have this process automated. When Websolr is added to the application, we will create a default index in the same region as your application, and add your special URL to an environment variable called WEBSOLR_URL. The index will be created with the Sunspot schema by default, and because Sunspot can already detect the WEBSOLR_URL variable, there is no additional setup required. If you need to change something, you can SSO to your dashboard with `heroku addons:open websolr -a APP-NAME` and change the schema accordingly.\",\n  \"title\": \"Note to Heroku users\"\n}\n[/block]\n\n## Wait, I have more questions!\n\n### What is a Solr index?\nA Solr index is the object used for indexing and retrieving information (analogous to a database table, although Solr itself should not be treated as a database).\n\n### Why is it not a database?\nIt gets a bit technical, but essentially Solr stores data in a structure known as an [inverted index](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_index), which is similar to looking at a table of contents in a textbook. What this means is that it doesn't exactly retain the source data like a traditional database would, but rather a version of it that has been translated to support fast lookups. Simply, this means that your data is broken down, analyzed and stored in a special way that makes extremely fast, accurate searches possible. The tradeoff is that it doesn't technically offer [ACID](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ACID) transactions. This is why Solr should only be used as a secondary data store.\n\n### How long will it take Solr to crawl my site?\nSolr is a passive data store, meaning it can only index data which has been explicitly sent to it. It is not a web crawler. However, another Apache project, [Nutch](https://nutch.apache.org/) can be used for this purpose, and Nutch can pipe data to Solr (and Websolr) for indexing and searching.  \n\n### I want to know something else!\nTake a look at our table of contents. We have plenty of documentation covering everything you would want to know. Can't find what you're looking for? [Shoot us an email](mailto:support:::at:::websolr.com), and we'll be glad to help!","hidden":false,"project":"56be3387be55991700c3ca0d","type":"basic","updates":[],"link_url":"","order":0,"parentDoc":null,"createdAt":"2016-11-23T20:45:04.247Z","excerpt":"","githubsync":"","link_external":false,"slug":"welcome-to-websolr","title":"Welcome to Websolr!","user":"5637d336aa96490d00a64f81","childrenPages":[]}

Welcome to Websolr!


Websolr is a SaaS provider that allows users to create and manage Apache Solr indices through an easy to use dashboard interface. This introductory page will take you through the basics of Websolr and what we offer. You can read more specifics by navigating to the pages linked on the left. ## What is Solr? Solr is a high performance server based on the [Apache Lucene](http://lucene.apache.org/) information retrieval library. It can be used for searching millions of pages of data in a few milliseconds, and returning highly relevant results. It is trusted by Fortune 500 companies, startups, and high traffic brands to deliver fast, accurate results. ## Up and running in 3 easy steps! Before you can use Solr with your application, you'll need to set up and configure an index. The process is very simple and straightforward: 1. When you first log in to Websolr, you will have the opportunity to create a new Solr index. 2. Creating an index requires 3 things: a name, a region and a schema. * The name of your index can be anything you want, it will simply allow you differentiate it from others you may create. Note: you can not have two indices with the same name. * The region will allow you to create the index on a server group in one of the regions we support. Currently, those are US-West (N. California), US-East (Virginia), and EU-West (Ireland). You should select a region that is nearby to wherever your application is hosted to get the lowest possible latency. * The schema will tell Solr how to set up your index. This generally varies by application. While users are able to submit their own custom schema, we also have a list of the most common Solr clients (what applications use to "talk" with Solr) available as a drop down. For example, if your application is based on Ruby on Rails and you're using the Sunspot gem, you can simply select one of the configurations marked 'Sunspot', and we'll handle the rest. 3. Once this information has been submitted, we'll go about the task of provisioning your index. We will provide you with a special URL that is unique to your index, and can be used to connect your application to Solr. That's it! With Websolr, you can be up and running with your very own Solr searches in no time. [block:callout] { "type": "info", "body": "Heroku users setting up Websolr as an addon will have this process automated. When Websolr is added to the application, we will create a default index in the same region as your application, and add your special URL to an environment variable called WEBSOLR_URL. The index will be created with the Sunspot schema by default, and because Sunspot can already detect the WEBSOLR_URL variable, there is no additional setup required. If you need to change something, you can SSO to your dashboard with `heroku addons:open websolr -a APP-NAME` and change the schema accordingly.", "title": "Note to Heroku users" } [/block] ## Wait, I have more questions! ### What is a Solr index? A Solr index is the object used for indexing and retrieving information (analogous to a database table, although Solr itself should not be treated as a database). ### Why is it not a database? It gets a bit technical, but essentially Solr stores data in a structure known as an [inverted index](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_index), which is similar to looking at a table of contents in a textbook. What this means is that it doesn't exactly retain the source data like a traditional database would, but rather a version of it that has been translated to support fast lookups. Simply, this means that your data is broken down, analyzed and stored in a special way that makes extremely fast, accurate searches possible. The tradeoff is that it doesn't technically offer [ACID](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ACID) transactions. This is why Solr should only be used as a secondary data store. ### How long will it take Solr to crawl my site? Solr is a passive data store, meaning it can only index data which has been explicitly sent to it. It is not a web crawler. However, another Apache project, [Nutch](https://nutch.apache.org/) can be used for this purpose, and Nutch can pipe data to Solr (and Websolr) for indexing and searching. ### I want to know something else! Take a look at our table of contents. We have plenty of documentation covering everything you would want to know. Can't find what you're looking for? [Shoot us an email](mailto:support@websolr.com), and we'll be glad to help!